Advancing Socio-economics: An Institutionalist Perspective

Table of Contents
Preface

Part I On Socio-Economic Concepts and Methods
Part II On Institutions
Part III On Social Systems of Production-and Beyond

About the Contributors

Tom R. Burns is professor of sociology, University of Uppsala in Sweden, where he is the founder of the Uppsala Theory Circle. His academic appointments have included the Clarence J. Robinson University Professorship at George Mason University, visiting professor at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin, fellow at the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences, and fellow at the European University Institute. He is the author or editor of at least eleven books and numerous scholarly articles in the area of social theory and methodology (socio-economics, institutional theory and analysis, the theory of games and interaction, and evolutionary theory). In addition, his empirical research and publications are in the areas of politics, the sociology of technology and environment, and comparative analysis of institutions and organizations. Among his books are Man, Decisions, Society (1985), The Shaping of Socio-economic Systems (1986), Creative Democracy (1988), Societal Decision-making: Democratic Challenges to State Technocracy (1992), Municipal Entrepreneurship and Energy Policy: A Five-Nation Study of Politics, Innovation, and Social Change (1994), Transitions to Alternative Energy Systems: Entrepreneurs, New Technologies, and Social Change (1984), Structuration: Economic and Social Change (2000).

Marcus Carson is a graduate student in the Department of Sociology, Uppsala University. He has degrees in psychology (B.A., Kalamazoo College) and sociology (B.S., Södertörns University College in Sweden). Previously he was engaged in policy making in the United States, where he worked with public interest and community organizations for more than seventeen years. He is currently collaborating with Tom Burns in research on policy making and governmental process in the European Union.

Steven Casper is University Lecturer in the area of innovation and entrepreneurship at the Judge Institute of Management Studies, Cambridge University. Previously he was research fellow at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin. He has published numerous scholarly articles in the areas of institutional theory, corporate governance, national systems of innovation, and the relationship between law and technical change. His current research concentrates on the diffusion of entrepreneurial business models in Europe, focusing on the biotechnology and software industries in Germany, the United Kingdom, and Sweden. He is the current chairperson of the Network on Knowledge, Economy, and Society for the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics.

Marie-Laure Djelic is professor at ESSEC, France. After undergraduate studies in business and in philosophy in France, she received her Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard. For her book, Exporting the American Model, she received the Max Weber Prize of the Organizations, Occupations and Work section of the American Sociological Association. Her present research projects focus on the interplay among globalization, the American model of political economy, and other national business systems. 

Amitai Etzioni is University Professor at George Washington University. Previously he was professor of sociology at Columbia University and during 1987-1989 he was the Thomas Henry Carroll Ford Foundation Professor at the Harvard Business School. He was the founder and the first president of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics (SASE) and is a lifetime honorary fellow of SASE. He is the editor of The Responsible Community: Rights and Responsibilities, a communitarian quarterly. He is frequently called the "guru" of the communitarian movement. He is a former president of the American Sociological Association, and he is the author of nineteen books, including The Limits of Privacy, The New Golden Rule: Community and Morality in a Democratic Society (recipient of the Simon Wiesenthal Center's 1997 Tolerance Book Award), The Spirit of Community: Rights, Responsibilities and the Communitarian Agenda, and The Moral Dimension: Toward a New Economics.

David Gear is a research associate who collaborates with J. Rogers Hollingsworth and Ellen Jane Hollingsworth at the University of Wisconsin on research involving the socio-economics of innovation in science and technology. In addition, he has considerable expertise in information technology. 

Greg Greenberg is a research associate at Yale University School of Medicine's Department of Psychiatry and a health sociologist at the Department of Veterans Affairs' Northeast Program Evaluation Center. He received his Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His dissertation was entitled "The Ties that Grind: Institutional Investors and the Movement from Vertical to Virtual Integration in the United States Pharmaceutical Sector." His current research is on how social capital and the organizational features of health delivery systems influence continuity of care. He is also doing research on how increasing competition in the U.S. health care sector is affecting traditional providers and minority access to health care.

Jerald Hage is professor of sociology at the University of Maryland and is the author or editor of fifteen books and numerous scholarly articles. Many of his books focus on the problem of organizational theory with a special emphasis on organizational innovation. Among his books are Social Change in Complex Organizations (with Michael Aiken), Theories of Organizations, Organizations, Working Together (with Catherine Alter), and most recently Organizational Innovation. Several books focus on the problems of comparing institutions and examining their performances: State Responsiveness and State Activism (with Robert Hanneman and Ed Gargan) and State Intervention in Medical Care (with J. Rogers Hollingsworth and Robert Hanneman). He was recently president of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics.

Peter A. Hall is Frank G. Thompson Professor of Government, Harvard College and the director of the Center for European Studies at Harvard University where he teaches courses on comparative political economy, European politics, and methods of political analysis. He holds degrees in economics and political science from the University of Toronto, Balliol College, Oxford, and Harvard University. He is the author of Governing the Economy (1986) as well as many articles on European political economy and policy making, and an editor of The Political Power of Economic Ideas (1989), Developments in French Politics 1 and 2 (1990 and 2001) and Varieties of Capitalism: The Institutional Foundations of Comparative Advantage (2001).

Robert Hanneman is professor of sociology at the University of California, Riverside. He is the author of several books and numerous scholarly articles. His books include State Responsiveness and State Activism (with Jerald Hage and Ed Gargan) and State Intervention in Medical Care (with Rogers Hollingsworth and Jerald Hage). Presently, he is engaged in joint work with Raymond Russell on the dynamics of populations of organizations in Israel and Russia, as well as two studies of the U.S. dry salt industry. One study is on trade-association activity and one is on organizational population dynamics. Other work in progress includes dynamic models and simulations of formal theories in sociology.

Geoffrey Hodgson is a research professor in business studies at the University of Hertfordshire in England. He was previously at the University of Cambridge. His books include Economics and Institutions (1988), Economics and Evolution (1993), Economics and Utopia (1999), and Evolution and Institutions (1999). He has published widely in various academic journals, including the Journal of Economic Literature, Economic Journal, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, and Cambridge Journal of Economics. 

Ellen Jane Hollingsworth, as a member of the University of Wisconsin Department of Sociology and previously, the Institute for Research on Poverty, is the author, co-author, or editor of six books and many articles on the delivery of social services in the United States and Europe. Her studies of service systems for people with severe mental illness and for people with other disadvantages have usually been framed with a socio-economics perspective. Her other work has been concerned with administration of welfare and health programs, modes for delivering social services to the needy, and administrative/legal constraints on public employees and clients. Her recent studies have centered on research institutions, organizations, and scientific laboratories, particularly in Britain.

J. Rogers Hollingsworth is professor of sociology and history and former chairperson of the Program in Comparative History at the University of Wisconsin. Awarded honorary degrees by the University of Uppsala (Sweden) and by Emory University, he is the author or editor of numerous books and articles on comparative political economy. One of his major research interests is the study of how organizational and institutional factors influence different types of innovations. His recent publications relevant to this volume include Contemporary Capitalism: The Embeddedness of Institutions (with Robert Boyer, 1997); Governing Capitalist Economies (with Philippe Schmitter and Wolfgang Streeck, 1994); The Governance of the American Economy (with John Campbell and Leon Lindberg, 1991); and The Search for Excellence: Organizations, Institutions, and Major Discoveries in Biomedical Science (with Ellen Jane Hollingsworth and Jerald Hage, forthcoming 2002). He is past president and also honorary fellow of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics.

Karl H. Müller has been head of the Departments of Political Science and Sociology at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IHS) in Vienna and is currently head of WISDOM-Research, Austria's social science infrastructure center on data archiving and method-development. His main research interests range from issues in complex modeling within the social sciences, from interdisciplinary analyses of innovation processes in science, technology, and economy to the newly emerging risk-potentials for contemporary society. For his research on innovation, knowledge, societies, and risk, he has developed a special approach which operates under the title of an "epigenetic research program" (ERP). His recent publications reflect his interests in the epigenetic architectures of contemporary knowledge societies, Market Expansion and Knowledge Integration: Double Movements within Modernity (1999), Socio-Economic Models and Societal Complexity: Intermediation and Design (1998), and Chaos 2000: The Global Time-Quake (1999). 

Claus Offe is one of Europe's most creative political scientists and sociologists. Presently, he is professor of political science, Humboldt University, Berlin. His fields of research are in the areas of social policy, democratic theory, and transformation studies. He is the author of numerous books and articles. His recent books in English include Varieties of Transition (1996), Modernity and the State: East and West (1996, with Jon Elster and Ulrich K. Preuss), and Constitutional Design in Post-Communist Societies: Rebuilding the Ship at Sea (1998).

Raymond Russell is professor of sociology at the University of California, Riverside. His past research has included studies of employee participation in ownership and decision making in a number of contexts, ranging from scavenger companies, taxi cooperatives, and ESOPs in the United States, to worker cooperatives in Israel, to state-owned, privatized, and new private enterprises in Russia. Articles based on this research have appeared in Research in the Sociology of Organizations, Journal of Comparative Economics, and Industrial Relations. His comprehensive account of the studies of Israeli worker cooperatives appears in Utopia in Zion: The Israeli Experience with Worker Cooperatives (1995). 

Robin Stryker is professor of sociology and law at the University of Minnesota. Recently, she was the president of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics (SASE). She has published papers extensively, in the American Sociological Review, the American Journal of Sociology, and elsewhere on institutional politics and on the use of economics in American regulatory law. Among her recent articles are "Globalizaton and the Welfare State" in the British Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 18: 1-49 (1998), "Legitimacy Processes as Institutional Politics" in Research in the Sociology of Organizations 17: 179-233 (2000), and "Political Culture Wars 1990s Style: The Drum Beat of Quotas in Media Framing of the Civil Rights Act of 1991" in Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 17: 33-106 (1999).

Sigurt Vitols is a senior research fellow at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung (WZB) His research interests center on corporate governance, financial regulation, and small business finance in advanced capitalist economies. His many publications include "Are German Banks Different?," Small Business Economics 10(2): 79-91 (1998); Corporate Governance in Large British and Germany Companies: Comparative Institutional Advantage or Competing for Best Practice (1997, with Steven Casper, David Soskice, and Stephen Woolcock); "The German Model in the 1990s" (co-edited with Steven Casper); Special Issue of Industry and Innovation, June 1997; "German Industrial Policy: An Overview," Industry and Innovation 4(1): 15-36 (1997); "Financial Systems and Industrial Policy in Germany and Great Britain: The Limits of Convergence," pp. 221-55 in D. Forsyth and T. Notermans, eds., Regime Changes: Macroeconomic Policy and Financial Regulation in Europe from the 1930s to the 1990s (1997). 

Frans van Waarden is professor of policy and organization at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. He has taught at the universities of Leyden, Konstanz, and Leipzig and has been visiting scholar at the Center for European Studies of Stanford University and the European University Institute in Florence. He has published on labor relations, co-determination, history of technology, textile industry, industrial policy, collective action, business associations, corporatism, and state-industry relations. His books include Fabriekslevens (1987); Het geheim van Twente (1987); Organisatiemacht van belangenverenigngen (1989); Organizing Business for War: Industrial Policy and Corporatism during the Second World War (1991); Cultures of Unemployment (1993); Convergence or Diversity? Internationalization and Economic Policy Response (1995); Ruimte rond regels: Stijlen van regulering en beleidsuitvoering vergeleken (1999) (on national administrative regulatory styles and discretionary authority of civil servants), and Deregulating Imperfect Markets: On the Role of Institutions on Markets (1999).

Table of Contents
Preface

Part I On Socio-Economic Concepts and Methods
Part II On Institutions
Part III On Social Systems of Production-and Beyond
Rogers Hollingsworth Homepage

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