J.P.SOMMERVILLE

367 Course Requirements

NOTE THAT THIS IS A THREE CREDIT COURSE; UNDERGRADUATES CAN TAKE IT WITH OR WITHOUT HONORS .

 

Instructor: Johann Sommerville
Email: jsommerv@wisc.edu
Office: 4127 Mosse Humanities
Mailbox: 4001
Office Hours: Tuesdays at 2:30 to 3:45, and by appointment.


LECTURE SLIDES ARE HERE  

 

Undergraduates:

  This is a 3 credit course; you can take it with or without Honors

  Requirements:

  

     Visit here for information on how to get a good grade.

Honors Term paper: write on one of these topics


(1) How and why did English society change in the century between 1580 and 1680?

(2) What arguments did people in the seventeenth century  use in favor of and against the Divine Right of Kings? How convincing were the arguments, and why did people find them persuasive?

(3) Why did religious and political radicalism spread in England in the mid-seventeenth century, what did the radicals want, and why did they fail to attain their objectives

(4) another topic, by arrangement.

    

A note on term papers and the Internet:

The term paper should cite at least two sources in addition to the course reading. You can find many sources in the footnotes and endnotes of the course reading, and in the three books listed above under "Reading." There is an excellent search engine at this link. A good link for buying books is here.

Be careful about using sources from the Internet, as they are not always reliable. As a general rule, use printed, published sources (though it's fine to use them in pdf versions available on the Internet.)

An extensive reading list on various aspects of early modern Britian, arranged by topic, is here.


Some useful web sites are: The Dictionary of National Biography (known as DNB): DA 28 D48 2 (Reference Room; 2S). This is a comprehensive, multi-volume work. It has recently been updated and is available electronically to UW students by clicking the link above;

                        British History Online.

                        British and US constitutional history

                        Centred on English dissenters but with web links to many other English history topics.

                        History online.

 

A good guide on questions of style, grammar etc. is available at The UW Writer's Handbook.

Finally, be aware that you should be careful to give proper citations for things you take from the Internet or from printed books and articles; take a look at this information on academic misconduct.

How much are the exams (etc.) worth?

Non-honors students: each mid-term 25%; final 50%
Honors students: term paper term paper 25%; each mid-term 18.75%; final 37.5%.

 

 

Graduates:

 Topics by arrangement. (Total grade consists of  50% for each paper.)